Clarinet Fingering, articulated g#, mid-Bb, full-boehm

Hello,
I’m an older (45) amateur clarinetist. I have several questions, and hopefully you have several answers. First, some info on me. I’m currently playing a Selmer Signature. Nice clarinet, darker and more resistant than my 1971 Buffet Evette Master Model that faithfully served through my Jr. & High school career. My oldest daughter started on this clarinet and I keep it as a back up. Too much history to part with. I also let my private students use it when they think they want to move on to wood.
My first question is your view on the Signature vs the Master Model. Even though I have a liking and use for both, I appreciate the opinions of other clarinetists. I’m currently principal clarinetist in a community band and Community Theater PIt Orchestra. I’m also seriously considering going back to school to obtain my degree in Instrumental Ed and Clarinet performance. A major undertaking for a women of my advanced age.
My second question has to do with a set of vintage 1920’s Selmer Full Boehm clarinets that I recieved as a Christmas gift from my husband. They are in need of a full repad and tenon corks to be completly playable, but otherwise are in excellent condition. NO cracks and the keys are tight and responsive. Pad and cork degradation is due to 30+ years of storage. Would you know of where I could obtain a fingering chart so that I can make full use of all of those wonderful keys and rings? Is the tone quality/intonation of these vintage clarinets relativly comparable to the clarinets of today? And after getting these old men refurbished would they suit my current situation?
I realize that some of these questions are hard to answer without having the clarinets and player present. But you have more experience in these areas. I’m always looking for ways to improve my playing. When I play better, I teach better.
Thank you for any insight and other wisdom you may have to share.
Tammi

The Selmer Signature and the Evette Master cannot really be compared, however yu seem to like both for different reasons as you have said.

The full boehm clarinet has a number of facilitating features which make playing in certain keys much easier. It is really an advantage over the plain boehm. It has not gained as much popularity as it ought to have because the instruments can be both expensive to purchase and somes difficult to adjust.
With the new prices now being stratospheric, everything is going up.

If the clarinet has a low Eb, this can also be used for the throat Bb and is sometimes quite good sounding or very convenient for a trill.
The articulated G#,C# is perhaps the most helpful. When you play in keys with either four flats or sharps you always keep the g# key down. When you precede it with F#, the G# comes out very easily without the blip that everyone else esperiences or can experience.
The next is the fork d#,Eb, fingered with the first and third fingers of the left hand rendering the fingering of either of these notes totally a simple matter by simply lifting the middle left hand finger.
Any standard full-boehm fingering chart will give you these in picture form. Or get Tom Ridenour’s quite excellent book on clarint fingerings, a good thing to have. He has a large clarinet website.

Best of luck, sherman friedland

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