Returning to the clarinet…and being flat, what to do?

Sherman
Over the last couple of years, I have taken up my clarinet after many
years of hiatus. I play a LeBlanc L7 with a Luyben mouthpiece and a
Mitchell Lurie 2.5 reed. My intonation, of course, is not what it used
to be. I tune to my piano on F in the chalumeau, and my pitch is a
little under. I have tried adjusting the angle of the clarinet when I
play. The tone is rich, but often is flat. The mouthpiece I am using is
the one I used in college 25 years ago! Also, FYI the pads were replaced
two years ago. My embouchure is weak, but like riding a bike, it is not
difficult to remember the basics.

Would you recommend a new mouthpiece and if so, which one best suits my
clarinet? I only recently found out that my L7 is a professional model.
I was a good clarinet player when I was younger, now I think it was the
instrument not the musician!
Love your website! You give great advice.Sincerely,
LT
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Hi L:
I think that more than the mouthpiece, the kind of reed that you use is doing
you a diservice. This kind of reed is not very sturdy in the heart
and my experience is that they play quickly out of the box,quite responsive, even encouraging however they
also die as quickly especially in the high register. The mouthpiece may by fine, though I do not have playing knowledge of Luyben.
I find that most students play on some kind of Van Doren or Selmer
mouthpiece.Selmer HS* is sometimes quite suitable and so too is the Van Doren B45, or 5RV Lyre.
I myself am currently playing a Van Doren M13, which seems quite good.
One more thing to remember: all mouthpieces play a little differently one from the other.(I know a lot about the Leblanc L7. Lovely instrument, and I have one and just sold a set.)
good luck,L
sherman

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